Top 10 Reasons to See The Baron’s Men: Reason 10 – Dirty Words

Posted: March 27, 2012 in Uncategorized

     It is often misconceived that Shakespeare and his ilk are for the high-brow, refined part of the populace.  This could not be further from the truth.  Granted, the use of the English language that stems from this period is, in my opinion, without equal.  That does not mean, however, that the baser, more ribald aspects of human interactions are not covered.  The Elizabethan playwrights were not above sprinkling their prose with more flowery language.  But in the hands of such genius these flowers take bloom and grow to a life of their own.  It is unfortunate that our Hollywood depiction of Shakespeare is only moonlit serenades and battlefield speeches.  True, these high-minded sentiments have given us some of the most powerful looking glasses from which to view life, but the true genius of the Bard is the craft he displays when talking about whores, sailors, and everyday riff-raff.   Shakespeare was meant for the masses, and the masses appreciated a good curse now and then.  And what cursing!  Did she just say cunt?  Yes she did.  But amidst such beautiful language that the mind takes a moment to catch up with the ear.  If you want to learn to curse like a sailor, join the Navy.  However, if you want to weave curses into the tapestry of life like a poet, come see the Baron’s Men.

The Baron’s Men Present – The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare

Fridays and Saturdays April 5th-27th, Thursdays April 18th & 25th

The Curtain Theatre, Austin, Texas

http://www.facebook.com/groups/30079279771/

http://thebaronsmen.org/tickets/

Advertisements
Comments
  1. Casey says:

    We were just commenting on how rough the opening dialogue of The Alchemist is. This is from the very first exchange our ‘heroes’ have in The Alchemist:

    “Away you varlet!” (pretty mild, right? But then…)

    “I fart at thee!” (Okay, now we’re at fourth grade humor…)

    “And lick figs out of my @##!” (Yes, you read it right. Poop humor. Third line of the play. So much for classy high-brow pretension, eh? )

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s